We had a server outage, and we're rebuilding the site. Some of the site features won't work. Thank you for your patience.
imc indymedia

Los Angeles Indymedia : Activist News

white themeblack themered themetheme help
About Us Contact Us Calendar Publish RSS
Features
latest news
best of news
syndication
commentary


KILLRADIO

VozMob

ABCF LA

A-Infos Radio

Indymedia On Air

Dope-X-Resistance-LA List

LAAMN List




IMC Network:

Original Cities

www.indymedia.org africa: ambazonia canarias estrecho / madiaq kenya nigeria south africa canada: hamilton london, ontario maritimes montreal ontario ottawa quebec thunder bay vancouver victoria windsor winnipeg east asia: burma jakarta japan korea manila qc europe: abruzzo alacant andorra antwerpen armenia athens austria barcelona belarus belgium belgrade bristol brussels bulgaria calabria croatia cyprus emilia-romagna estrecho / madiaq euskal herria galiza germany grenoble hungary ireland istanbul italy la plana liege liguria lille linksunten lombardia london madrid malta marseille nantes napoli netherlands nice northern england norway oost-vlaanderen paris/Île-de-france patras piemonte poland portugal roma romania russia saint-petersburg scotland sverige switzerland thessaloniki torun toscana toulouse ukraine united kingdom valencia latin america: argentina bolivia chiapas chile chile sur cmi brasil colombia ecuador mexico peru puerto rico qollasuyu rosario santiago tijuana uruguay valparaiso venezuela venezuela oceania: adelaide aotearoa brisbane burma darwin jakarta manila melbourne perth qc sydney south asia: india mumbai united states: arizona arkansas asheville atlanta austin baltimore big muddy binghamton boston buffalo charlottesville chicago cleveland colorado columbus dc hawaii houston hudson mohawk kansas city la madison maine miami michigan milwaukee minneapolis/st. paul new hampshire new jersey new mexico new orleans north carolina north texas nyc oklahoma philadelphia pittsburgh portland richmond rochester rogue valley saint louis san diego san francisco san francisco bay area santa barbara santa cruz, ca sarasota seattle tampa bay tennessee urbana-champaign vermont western mass worcester west asia: armenia beirut israel palestine process: fbi/legal updates mailing lists process & imc docs tech volunteer projects: print radio satellite tv video regions: oceania united states topics: biotech

Surviving Cities

www.indymedia.org africa: canada: quebec east asia: japan europe: athens barcelona belgium bristol brussels cyprus germany grenoble ireland istanbul lille linksunten nantes netherlands norway portugal united kingdom latin america: argentina cmi brasil rosario oceania: aotearoa united states: austin big muddy binghamton boston chicago columbus la michigan nyc portland rochester saint louis san diego san francisco bay area santa cruz, ca tennessee urbana-champaign worcester west asia: palestine process: fbi/legal updates process & imc docs projects: radio satellite tv
printable version - js reader version - view hidden posts - tags and related articles

Tempe Police compile secret dossiers on people that make complaints!

by Mayor Hugh Hallman Hitler Stalin Mao Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2009 at 7:29 AM

Hmmm ... the police and government compile secret dossiers on people that make complaints! Yes this is America in 2009 but its is still run like Nazi Germany or Stalins Soviet Union, and we just think we have rights

Woman fights home's 'hazard' listing

Police defend designation but won't say why residence was flagged

by Dianna M. Náñez - Oct. 12, 2009 12:00 AM

The Arizona Republic

A Tempe woman's 911 call has uncovered widespread use of a police database that flags addresses across the Valley as hazards without ever consulting the people living in the houses.

Local and national law-enforcement agencies use the database to collect information about Valley residences. The information, filed into a computer-aided dispatch system, can include prior emergency calls to a home, as well as criminal activity or threats tied to an address.

Valley police departments claim that the databases are "internal" or "private" and that releasing their contents to the public could endanger public-safety officials or residents. Police call the databases an invaluable public-safety tool.

Civil-liberties advocates acknowledge the system's usefulness, but they say it has the potential to raise suspicion unjustly about a person.

One Tempe resident has discovered that once a residence is labeled a threat, there is little recourse to challenge the accusation.

Eleanor Holguin discovered her address is on Tempe Police Department's hazard list when she called 911 for a medical emergency in August.

Holguin's fight with Tempe had begun months before that 911 call. Earlier in the year, she had criticized Police Chief Tom Ryff in an unrelated matter, going so far as to say he should resign.

Then in August, she found her elderly father on the floor and called 911. As paramedics cared for her father, two Tempe police cars showed up.

Holguin said a paramedic said he wanted to speak to her and an officer outside. She said the paramedic asked if she had recently moved to the address or if she knew of any reason why her house would be "put on a hazard file."

Holguin responded that her family had lived at the address for 40 years. Not familiar with a hazard file, she said she asked the paramedic to explain the term.

Holguin said the paramedic told her that "whenever we get that (hazard) dispatch on our call log it means we're possibly going into a hostile situation. That could mean other things like you could be on some terrorist list."

Holguin was dumbfounded. Then, she recalled the complaints she made against Ryff.

"It's intimidation ... because I spoke out" against the police chief, she said.

Holguin sent an e-mail to Tempe's city manager and City Council and later met several council members to ask why her address was on the list.

On Aug. 14, Holguin got a response from City Manager Charlie Meyer: "You raised a question about your residence being listed as a potential 'hazard.' I have consulted with the city attorney and have decided that any such information related to any address in the city being listed as a potential 'hazard' to public-safety personnel is not appropriate to release due to the sensitive nature of such information."

Holguin has attended three council meetings to express her outrage.

"Who knows how many people are on this list?" she asked. "It's not bad just for me, but also for the paramedics and the police. The person who did this is . . . reckless and irresponsible . . . that they would put these men and women into a position to be thinking that they're going into a hostile situation."

Although Holguin has gotten no response from police, Tempe's fire chief last month agreed to notify firefighters that dispatches to her address should be handled the same as any other call.

On Friday, Ryff denied Holguin was being singled out.

"I support citizens' rights to voice concerns regarding any public officials including me as a police chief," he said. "I can tell you that in my entire career, I have never placed or asked that anyone be placed on a hazard file. I have not retaliated against Miss Holguin indirectly or directly."

But Tempe police refuse to say what placed her on the list.

Releasing information about why an address is a threat could anger a resident, leaving public-safety officials and the public at risk, Tempe Sgt. Steve Carbajal said.

Some other Valley agencies agreed. Although Mesa, Surprise, Buckeye and Avondale police said they do not notify residents of flagging, they would likely release the reason for flagging to a homeowner if asked, unless doing so compromised an investigation.

Alessandra Soler Meetze, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Arizona, acknowledged the system could be a valuable police intelligence-gathering tool. But that should not outweigh residents' right to address police allegations, she said.

People should have an opportunity to "challenge that information, correct any inaccuracies and make sure that the intelligence being gathered is being done for legitimate purposes ... (not) because of someone's First Amendment activities," she said.

Police officials said that the system is not abused and that in most cases an officer must have a supervisor's approval to file a residence as a hazard.

Republic reporters Lisa Halverstadt, Dustin Gardiner, Megan Boehnke, Jackee Coe, JJ Hensley and Ofelia Madrid contributed to this article.
Report this post as:
Share on: Twitter, Facebook, Google+

add your comments


LATEST COMMENTS ABOUT THIS ARTICLE
Listed below are the 10 latest comments of 1 posted about this article.
These comments are anonymously submitted by the website visitors.
TITLE AUTHOR DATE
Nothing secret about it Fredric L. Rice Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2009 at 2:10 PM
© 2000-2018 Los Angeles Independent Media Center. Unless otherwise stated by the author, all content is free for non-commercial reuse, reprint, and rebroadcast, on the net and elsewhere. Opinions are those of the contributors and are not necessarily endorsed by the Los Angeles Independent Media Center. Running sf-active v0.9.4 Disclaimer | Privacy